21May

Review: Noel Coward’s “Present Laughter”

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Last week I was graced with the opportunity to witness Kevin Kline once again on the NYC stage. I had seen him in several Shakespeare plays at the Delacorte, but seeing him play Garry Essendine in Noel Coward's "Present Laughter" was a treat like none other. Merely witnessing his comedic skill for 2-1/2 hours is worthwhile, so the fact that the production is excellent makes it even more so. “Present Laughter” is simply pure joy.The play takes place over the course of four scenes in two acts covering roughly 10 days as Garry prepares to leave London to Read More

14May

The Broadway Show That Changed Everything

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A few months ago, I was on an international flight and happened upon the documentary, Life Animated, the true story of an autistic boy who learned to talk watching Disney films. Tears swelled up in my eyes, thinking of the power of the arts and my own son who has ADHD and sensory issues. I had been trying to use this power in our own lives for years without much success until one day, when everything changed with a single show. I first took my cue at Stomp, which I took him to see in 2010, when he was 6 years old. He managed for the most part, but Read More

13May

Review: “Natasha, Pierre and the Great Comet of 1812”: An Epic Pop Opera

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My teen and I had a particularly unique theatrical experience the other night in NYC and it's called Natasha, Pierre and the Great Comet of 1812. All I can say is, what took me so long? I love grand historical musicals on this scale. It was also truly a great choice for my teen, too. It's a slice of history AKA War and Peace by Tolstoy, about a family in Russia circa 1812; it's a love story; it's a tragedy. It's educational; it's entertaining; the music is amazing. But it's just so much more. Natasha, Pierre and the Great Comet of 1812 It's a pop Read More

08May

Raleigh, North Carolina: An Unexpected Family-Friendly Getaway

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This past weekend I spent a few busy days in Raleigh, North Carolina. Having grown up in Georgia, I'm not a stranger to the Southern state, but I'd yet to really explore it as a parent and I was very impressed with what I found. Firstly, Raleigh is a very short flight from New York City. It took less than 90 minutes in the air. One minute, I was in a windy, rainy, cold NYC, the next in a green, flowery Southern city. The airport is relatively small and easy to get through, and it offers over 400 flights daily so you can get to Raleigh from virtually Read More

28Apr

The Women’s March: 100 Days Later

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A few months ago, I posted about the Women's March and why it was a day that changed everything. My teenage daughter and I made the trek from NYC to Washington, DC, along with thousands of other women. As soon as we boarded the train, it felt monumental. After two months of literally crying over the outcome of the election, I felt like I had found my people at the march. I was surrounded by like-minded people both on and off the stage. In my blog post I wrote that were "women who want a future like the one I want for my daughter –"where abortion is Read More

27Apr

“Amelie” on Broadway Captures the Movie’s Quirkiness

Amélie, A New MusicalWALTER KERR THEATRE

Confession: I'm a movie buff. I've seen most of the classics. One could call me a cinephile as I'm a French film lover. From Godard to Truffault to Renior to Malle to Rohmer, I've seen and studied French cinema. In 2001, I saw a film called "Amelie" by Jean-Pierre Jeunet. I'll never truly forget the pleasure I felt watching that movie. It starred the adorable Audrey Taotou, who played a dreamer. I remember her character zipping around Paris and delighting in the world that she lived in. She was quirky and an idealist. The film was colorful, and so Read More

23Apr

Review: Lillian Hellman’s “The Little Foxes” on Broadway

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The role of Regina Giddens in Lillian Hellman's The Little Foxes has to be one of the most powerful female roles in stage history. She's a fiercely strong Southern woman who struggles for wealth and freedom within the confines of an early 20th-century society where fathers considered only sons as their legal heirs. The play is set in Alabama circa 1900 during a dinner that Regina and her brothers attend. It is there that they agree that they want more money and collaborate on a scheme to go into business with a Chicago developer who wants to build a Read More

21Apr

Why “13 Reasons Why” Should Be Your Next Binge

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I just finished 13 Reasons Why and I feel compelled to write my feelings about the show. Watching it was a very intense experience, one that I was slightly reluctant to have after reading some of the negative press about how it glorifies teenage suicide. However, my daughter raced through the series in a matter of days  and came out of the experience with only high praise for its storylines and characters. Regardless, every mom under the sun has told me that it's absolutely necessary to watch it. After all, it tackles some very serious issues other than Read More

12Apr

Review: “Significant Other” on Broadway

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Significant Other, written by Joshua Harmon, is playing at the Booth Theater for another week. For a small play that started at the Roundabout Theatre Company and made its way to Broadway following a popular run, this is a play that's definitely worth seeing. As Harmon's follow-up to Bad Jews, the play is a funny romantic comedy that revolves around three weddings and a funeral (literally). Jordan, played by Gideon Glick, plays the male lead, surrounded by mainly a cast of women. He's a gay, young, successful guy trying to find his way, while he feels Read More

06Apr

Review: “Gifted” Movie Teaches Girls About Breaking Barriers

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The movie "Gifted," coming to theaters nationwide this Friday has a lot going for it. For one thing, it delves into the issue of having a gifted child and asks important questions: Do you keep these children in a regular school, surrounded by a variety of types of children and let them be ordinary kids? Or do you put them in a setting where their skills are nurtured so that they can prepare for an extraordinary life and career? The movie also features a great cast, has a lot of humor and offers several tear-jerking moments. Chris Evans plays Frank, a Read More